Flotsam and jetsam (6/4)

try me

try me

Good Reads

  • On-the-Job Training Isn’t Working:  The on-the-job training of pastors and other faith leaders in preventing and responding to child sexual abuse isn’t working – it is dangerous and all too often has devastating consequences. (Boz Tchividjian)
  • Pastors, You Make Your Own Sandwiches: I would be the first to amen the confession blogs, as I am overworked, often discouraged, and take everything in the church personally. But the reality is, I make my own sandwich. My church isn’t to blame, I am. My schedule isn’t to blame, I am. It’s a sandwich I made, and instead of complaining and chomping through it, I want to find joy in it. (Gospel Coalition)
  • Mixing Soul Medicines:  These days, though, the relationship between secular shrinks and old-time faith isn’t usually as hostile or mutually exclusive in practice as these battle-cries would suggest. Both in academic scholarship and the everyday experience of people who need help or provide it, the two worlds seem to be overlapping more and more. (The Economist)

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Flotsam and jetsam (6/1)

how i like my coffee

how i like my coffee

Good Reads

  • Christian humanism and the Twitter tsunamis: So you can see that my own response to the problems I’ve been seeing discussed on Twitter is a Christian one, more specifically one grounded in a theological anthropology that sees all of us as creatures made in the image of God who have (again, all of us) defaced that image. And it is in the recognition of our shared humanity — both in its glories and its failings but often starting with its failings — that we build our case against abuse and exploitation. (Alan Jacobs)
  • Why 80% of the Work You Do Is a Waste of Time:  It’s an old theory, honestly, but Koch explains it well and helps us apply it in new ways. And this theory applies to much more than work. It also means 80 percent of our unhealthiness is likely coming from just 20 percent of the food we eat. And 80 percent of our social troubles likely come from just 20 percent of our relationships. (Don Miller)

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Flotsam and jetsam (5/28)

funny-120

funny-120

Good Reads

  • Faking Cultural Literacy:  It’s never been so easy to pretend to know so much without actually knowing anything. (New York Times)
  • On TV, How Dark Is Too Dark? ” There is something in us, as storytellers and as listeners to stories, that demands the redemptive act, that demands that what falls at least be offered the chance to be restored,” Flannery O’Connor wrote in Mystery and Manners. That is true. Our problems start when we expect that restoration to arise through human action, even the fictional kind. (Hermeneutics)
  • Judging Spinoza: Like Galileo, disciplined by the Roman Catholic Church just two decades before him, Spinoza has gone down as one of history’s great thinkers punished by intolerant ecclesiastic authorities for his intellectual boldness. (New York Times)

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Flotsam and jetsam

sneezing-bless-you

sneezing-bless-you

Good Reads

  • Searching for Jesus in today’s Church:  Yes, there are days I grieve. But that grief is only overshadowed by the hope I still have in Jesus – the King who turns everything upside down, and who is very good. (Boz Tchividjian)
  • ‘One Anothers’ I Can’t Find in the New Testament:  Sanctify one another, humble one another, scrutinize one another, pressure one another, embarrass one another, corner one another, interrupt one another, defeat one another, sacrifice one another, shame one another, judge one another, run one another’s lives, confess one another’s sins, intensify one another’s sufferings, point out one another’s failings . . . . (Ray Ortlund)
  • Could Quitting Facebook Be a Mistake?  Facebook (Instagram, Twitter) didn’t invent the disconnection between my husband and me. It didn’t invent jealousy or time-wasting or procrastination or coveting other people’s stuff. It didn’t invent self-centeredness. All of these things existed long before Facebook or Instagram did.  So why do we assume quitting Facebook will eradicate the problem? The problem isn’t Facebook. The problem is us. (Relevant)

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