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Flotsam and jetsam (2/20)

Good Reads

  • What Christians Should Seek in a College Education: You are paying for access to people. In this era, information is becoming very cheap. Sitting in your bedroom, you can access more books than you could ever read, more film than you could ever watch, and more well formed opinions than you could ever consider. What we need is community, informed community that will get to know us and help us learn.
  • Where Have All the Babies Gone? More and more Americans are childless by choice. But what makes sense for the individual may spell disaster for the country as a whole.
  • Stop Apologizing for What You Like to Read: The best way to take back power from people who want to make chatting about books into the worst parts of the most draconian high school English class ever is to let them know we don’t care. That we read not always to grow or learn or impress or define ourselves but once in a while, or even lots of the time, for the pleasure of the act.

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Flotsam and jetsam (2/18)

I must get one of the these!

Good Reads

  • The End of a Catholic Moment: The collapse in the church’s reputation has coincided with a substantial loss of Catholic influence in American political debates.
  • Calling All Christians: If the church wants to reach young people, start by affirming their callings outside the church.

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Flotsam and jetsam (2/15)

Good Reads

  • How Can I Tell If I’m Called to Pastoral Ministry? I’ve been asked the question many times, and I’m not sure I agree with it. The question often assumes that pastors, unique among all the vocations of the world, will (and sometimes must) have a powerful, divine, subjective call to ministry that overwhelmingly points them in their God-ordained direction. I don’t see support for that sort of normative experience in Scripture.
  • A Critic Reflects on Pope Benedict: I’ve written more than my fair share criticizing the way that some bishops, the Pope included, communicate their messages, whether through employing overly harsh language, creating too cozy of a relationship with right-wing politicos, or turning a blind eye toward those living on the margins of church and world. But these injustices didn’t spring to mind yesterday. Something else entirely filled my thoughts.
  • How the Internet Reinforces Inequality in the Real World: Every technological innovation today around a new smart-phone app or web platform improving quality of life in cities comes with a caveat. What about the people who can’t access those tools? What about the people on the other side of the digital divide who lack access to home computers, Internet connections, unlimited data plans? These are the people who go “unmapped” in the geoweb.
  • Is Love More Real When Grounded in Faith? The life of faith detects that there is a fourth dimension to add to this third, a divine love that is there waiting. It holds all because it is the source of the love that flows through all. Fear and uncertainty do not cease. Human love always feels a bit like that. But faith is the felt sense that love can be trusted because love is, in truth, the ground of reality.

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Flotsam and jetsam (2/13)

Good Reads

  • The Pope’s Legacy: Pope Benedict XVI may likely remembered as a pope who in his relatively short pontificate, sought primarily to strengthen the orthodoxy of the church in a variety of means, who authored several important encyclicals, notable for their theological depth and appeal, and who continued a full set of public appearances, and who, despite his full schedule, published three well-received books on the life of Jesus.
  • Top 10 Reasons Our Kids Leave Church: I work in a major college town with a large number of 20-somethings. Nearly all of them were raised in very typical evangelical churches. Nearly all of them have left the church with no intention of returning. I spend a lot of time with them and it takes very little to get them to vent, and I’m happy to listen. So, after lots of hours spent in coffee shops and after buying a few lunches, here are the most common thoughts taken from dozens of conversations.
  • Americans Reveal Their 3 Favorite Sins: “Temptations and America’s Favorite Sins,” a survey conducted by the Barna Group, a Christian research firm, concludes that the moral struggles that vex most Americans aren’t the salacious acts that drive the plotlines of reality television shows. Most Americans are too worn down or distracted to get snared by those vices.

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Flotsam and jetsam (2/11)

Good Reads

  • Why Only Some Grammar Rules Are Breakable: Deviate too far from the “who died and made you king” rules, and your writing will look ignorant and amateurish. Deviate from the descriptive rules and you’re no longer writing English. But deviate from the aesthetic rules, and you end up either with a mess or with a masterpiece. Art is like that.
  • The God of Job: A pastoral theology which has not grappled with the whirlwind and the speeches of the last part of Job is sub-biblical; and preaching which does not take these things into account is not biblical preaching.
  • These United States of Crunk & Bible Studies: A Sentiment Analysis of Geocoded Tweets. The goal was to determine the mood of a county’s population, whether they were tweeting more about getting drunk or going to bible study.

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Flotsam and jetsam (2/8)

Good Reads

  • Resist the Urge to Do Cutting Edge Youth Ministry: In a valuable manner, youth ministry people seek to keep a watchful eye on the most efficacious means by which to reach teenagers. It is part of what makes the field exciting and dynamic. At the same time, youth ministry can dedicate exorbitant amounts of attention to finding a magic bullet in our methodology.
  • The Biblical Case for Immigration Reform: The key to this conversation is not to begin with the legal issue….You need to get there. You don’t start there. You start with these immigrants as people.”

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Flotsam and jetsam (2/4)

pirating pirates pirate

Good Reads

  • Foolishness!: It is perhaps fair to say that most believers do not quite realize the outrageous character of these most basic and taken-for-granted hallmarks of Christianity….Irrespective of whether they are true or not, these are surely among the wildest and most monstrous claims ever proposed in human history….Yet somehow, in the course of nearly 2,000 years, these claims have become so familiar, so tamed and domesticated, as to seem hardly worthy of comment, let alone wonder or puzzlement, among the great majority of those who profess them.
  • A Brief History of Nerds in Pop Culture: In news that is not actually news, nerds are no longer the shameful outsiders of society, they are celebrated and treated like exotic zoo animals, adorable and mystical and called fake by other exotic zoo animals. But how did this happen?
  • Was Ist das Super Bowl? How international news outlets cover America’s unique festival of “commercials featuring animals and blue-collar sexist smut.”

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Flotsam and jetsam (2/1)

Good Reads

  • Eight Brilliant Minds on the Future of Online Education: The advent of massively open online classes (MOOCs) is the single most important technological development of the millennium so far. I say this for two main reasons. First, for the enormously transformative impact MOOCs can have on literally billions of people in the world. Second, for the equally disruptive effect MOOCs will inevitably have on the global education industry.
  • Five Things Evangelicals Need to Face in the Next 10 Years: The sky isn’t falling for evangelicals, but we do have reason to look in the mirror. As the church continues to navigate an increasingly post-Christian culture, we have to ask ourselves if we are willing to face some truths and change some behaviors to reach the world with the message of the gospel.
  • Hebrews Out Loud: The book of Hebrews seems to have been written for the ear. Or, if that claim is true, perhaps it should be made in this form: the sermon to the Hebrews was designed to be spoken aloud.

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Flotsam and jetsam (1/28)

HT Tim Challies

Good Reads

  • How difficulty nourishes creativity: Robert Frost famously quipped, “I’d no sooner write free verse than play tennis with the net down.” Frost had meter; Christian leaders have budget shortfalls and funding stipulations or liturgical formulae and intractable congregations. Such difficulties offer the gift of rough ground against which we find traction to press forward to solutions, and learning to receive such resistance as a gift is the heart of “traditioned innovation.”
  • Divine Rhetoric: God In The Inaugural Address: In modern times, religion has become so intertwined in our political rhetoric that the failure of any president to invoke God in a speech as important as the inaugural could hardly escape notice. Thanks to this graphic in The Wall Street Journal, we noticed the presidents who did (nearly all) and the few who didn’t (Teddy Roosevelt, Rutherford B. Hayes).
  • Secret Fears of Your Pastor: The bottom line for many pastors…is that they are afraid to level with their people — person to person.

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Flotsam and jetsam (1/23)

Coincidence? I think not.

Good Reads

  • As public religion declines, faith goes to the movies: The point is not that these movies are pro-Christian, or pro any other religion for that matter. Some of them are most definitely not. Still, it is striking how persistently we, as a culture, are addressing faith and spirituality in our films even as institutional religion recedes from our public lives.
  • On the Necessity of Theological Courage in the Public Square: In the grand Christian ethical tradition, prudence, temperance, justice, and fortitude or ‘courage’ have formed what are called the cardinal virtues, from the Latin meaning ‘the hinge of the door.’ According to our guides, all other virtues “hinge” upon practicing these virtues as necessary for experiencing the moral life.
  • Reading Luther Wisely But Well:  Luther is a complex thinker whose writings in the hands of the inept enthusiast fulfill a function analogous to that of a cut-throat razor in the hands of a child who wants to emulate his father’s morning routine ‘so as to be just like daddy.’ The result can be messy and sometimes dangerous.

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